• Users Online: 290
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Reader Login
Export selected to
Endnote
Reference Manager
Procite
Medlars Format
RefWorks Format
BibTex Format
  Most popular articles (Since October 08, 2013)

 
 
  Archives   Most popular articles   Most cited articles
 
Hide all abstracts  Show selected abstracts  Export selected to
  Viewed PDF Cited
REVIEW ARTICLES
Women in the Rig Vedic age
Naorem Jiteswori Devi, Kambhampati Subrahmanyam
January-June 2014, 2(1):1-3
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.157985  
The role of women in orienting life and family were elucidated in Rig Vedic age. They enjoyed independence and self-reliance. Besides their domestic role, they had every access to education with tremendous potential to realize the highest truths. Many of them were seers who had an intellectual and spiritual depth. Women played an important role in maintaining the economic status of the family with the occupation of spinning, weaving, and needlework. Widow's remarriage was permitted in Rig Vedic society as evidenced in the funeral hymn in the Rig Veda. Caste system in the society did not seem to be strict. During this time inter-caste marriages took place in society. Women learned several disciplines that included vocal and instrumental music and dance. Women were also allowed to learn martial pursuits. Respect and value of the women in the Vedic society not merely as household mistress but also as individuals with great potential to contribute to human society were revealed.
  9,630 430 -
Triguna as personality concept: Guidelines for empirical research
Judu V Ilavarasu, Sarasvati Mohan, Alex Hankey
January-June 2013, 1(1):15-20
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.123287  
In the East triguna is considered an important personality concept. Compared to western models of personality, triguna is less popular globally. Even in the East, research on triguna is scarce. Interest in the area peaked in the 1970s when theoretical works led to the development of several questionnaires. However, practical use of these tools failed to take off. Triguna research remains sporadic, strongly suggesting a lack of channelized work. The new tools, which were developed are also not much used. Apart from psychology, in recent times, management research has taken to investigating triguna and other related constructs like karma yoga. Considering the current situation of triguna research, if guidelines were drawn up, researchers would have a direction to guide their studies, at least for coming few years and be able to contribute incrementally to the field. This paper is presented in light of these considerations. We discuss the concept of triguna, characteristics of a successful personality theory and challenges in triguna research, in light of which we propose a set of eight guidelines to assist future research in the field. In addition, we discuss some of the new tools emerging from mainstream psychology, which may also be used in triguna research. Hopefully, we may look forward to some major landmarks of evidences for the triguna construct, over the coming period of time.
  8,095 1,126 -
Indian psychology, parapsychology and spiritual psychology
K Ramakrishna Rao
January-June 2013, 1(1):4-14
Science and religion are generally considered to be disparate and inconsistent, if not conflicting, attempts at understanding reality. However, they need not be so considered. Spiritual psychology may be seen as a discipline that combines in its pursuit spirituality and science. We can conceive of spiritual psychology as a science in search of the sacred. Indian psychology derived and constructed from classical Indian philosophies of mind and practices like yoga, and parapsychology as pursued in the West provide indirect support to spiritual psychology. They suggest possible existence of paranormal sources of knowing and states of consciousness that transcend the cerebro-centric conception of human nature. A meta-theory of spiritual psychology and Indian psychology presented here shows the complementarity of science and spirituality. Some of the important conceptual and methodological issues in studies of spirituality and parapsychology are discussed. The implications of these for studying and understanding parapsychological phenomena are considered.
  5,670 510 -
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
The concept of Jnana, Vijnana and Prajnana according to Vedanta philosophy*
MK Sridhar
January-June 2015, 3(1):5-8
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.161024  
The words such as jnana, vijnana and prajnana have wide and multifarious meanings in the Hindu thoughts and especially in the Vedanta philosophy. They just does not mean any kind of knowledge but a systematic methodology and encompass a plethora of disciplines, be it in the realms of art, science or philosophy. The aim and purpose of such knowledge are to help the individual in attaining happiness and welfare in this world leading to salvation. The goals of every Hindu, nay, any seeker revolves around the proper understanding and perceiving the above concepts and implementing them personally for a meaningful and purposeful living in this world and the world hereafter. This paper examines the etymology of the words jnana, vijnana and prajnana, their connotations and denotations from the domains of grammar and Vedanta philosophy. Jnana stands for knowledge, vijnana for the systematic study of a branch of learning, science, intellectual awareness and consciousness. Prajnana stands for profound knowledge, wisdom, ultimate reality or Brahman. These words are inter-related and connote a higher meaning in the realm of spiritualism. This paper also attempts to compare these concepts from the standpoint of modern scientific methodology and consciousness debates.
  5,319 472 1
Kāla and Mahakāla: Time and the timeless in the Vedic literature
Ramesh N Rao, Alex Hankey, HR Nagendra, R Nagarathna
January-June 2013, 1(1):40-48
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.123291  
Background: Several recent experimental studies have strongly suggested that the ancient concept of 'Muhurta', or influence of starting time on outcome of a process or project, can be tested in systems in microbiology. This implies that factors connected to Jyotish astrology can act on biological systems, leading to the study of time as a heterogeneous variable in biological and social sciences. Aims: The purpose is to provide perspectives on the new results by exploring ancient conceptions of time, as recorded in various sections of the Vedic literature, with reference to conceptions of time within Vedic astrology. Materials and Methods: Various sections of the Vedic literature and associated philosophies were examined; statements concerning the nature of time were abstracted and integrated. Results: Various different conceptions of time are described, in order to show how the profound relationship between the timeless and time, first experienced in meditation, was first conceptualized and understood. The distinction between the Real and unreal, the indivisible, timeless reality underlying time, and measurable time, corresponding to mahakāla and kāla (the timeless and time), is used to define ritual time (Karma kāla), which was the original purpose of Jyotish astrology-to help guarantee the success of ritual actions. Discussion and Conclusions: Only by expanding awareness beyond time, kala, to become established in the timeless, mahakala, can an individual be liberated and go beyond the 'bite of time'.
  4,474 421 -
REVIEW ARTICLES
Review of Rāgās and its Rasās in Indian music and its possible applications in therapy
Nagarajan Karuna, Thaiyar M Srinivasan, HR Nagendra
January-June 2013, 1(1):21-28
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.123288  
The imbalances between our outlook toward life and insight cause stress. This could most of the times result in psychosomatic ailments. By modification of our innermost attitude, we can bring peace, satisfaction and comfort irrespective of the external environment. There are many systems of healing for countering perceived stress, which helps to manage stress as well as its impact on the systems of the body. In this paper, an attempt is made to review the Indian Rāgās and the interwoven agreeable rasās (aesthetic mood) in them. The willful submission to the notes of the music and the willingness to release the negative thought patterns may be helpful in healing physically. Based on many research made on the metaphysical causation of disease, we have attempted to list particular melody or rāgās depicting a particular aesthetic mood, which could help to heal a particular disease.
  4,369 383 -
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
The chakra system as a bio-socio-psycho-spiritual model of consciousness: Anahata as heart-centered consciousness
Robert Beshara
January-June 2013, 1(1):29-33
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.123289  
Today, to most scientific materialists the seat of consciousness is the brain. According to the dominant strand of this reductionist monist view, consciousness - and naturally the mind of which it is a part - is an epiphenomenon of the brain. This is a metaphysical assumption and as far as I know, there has not been any proof as of yet to support such a claim (aka the hard problem of consciousness). According to scientism, the mind is an illusion, albeit, a useful one from an evolutionary standpoint. This illusion - which strangely enough is not too different from the Hindu notion of maya - has helped us not only survive for thousands of years but also adapt more quickly to our environment. Even though our holographic-like representations of physical reality or the noumenal world are not accurate they are close enough to the-thing-itself that we have succeeded to control and abuse the planet and its resources while dominating other species along the way, to say the least. Why is this the case? Are we too much in our heads? Are we too caught up in our emotions? Clearly, there is an imbalance within and without us for which we are primarily responsible; the results of this global imbalance are such things as threats to biodiversity, war, poverty, and health issues to name but a few. We are using the wrong lenses metaphysically speaking and that is partially why we have been distorting reality, be it monism or dualism. The contributions of science ever since the Scientific Revolution are immense and grateful to them we are, especially in terms of their technological application. However, the dark side is that industrialization has made us more dehumanized and social media has made us more disconnected in the real world. The argument here is not whether technology is good or bad, but rather the question is how can we create eco-friendly technologies (from our cars to our cities) that are harmonious with nature in the ultimate or nondual sense. So what is missing? Perhaps the will is. Maybe we have been blinded by our selfishness to the extent that we cannot see beyond our desires. The paradigm shift hinted at here is one that is reminiscent of the Buddhist concept of the Middle Way, the goal being global coherence through individual transformation, which cannot happen unless there is balance in the first place and the key is balancing the heart.
  3,740 425 -
BRIEF REPORT
Dispositional mindfulness and its relation to impulsivity in college students
Sasidharan K Rajesh, Judu V Ilavarasu, TM Srinivasan
January-June 2013, 1(1):49-52
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.123292  
Context: Impulsivity is a fundamental component, consistently associated with understanding and diagnosis of various neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders. Aims: The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between self-reported dispositional mindfulness and impulsivity in a sample of college students. Settings and Design: This is a correlational study using a sample of 370 undergraduate students (226 females and 144 males) from three colleges, in Kerala, India. Participants age ranged from 18 to 26 years with a mean age of 19.47 years (standard deviation = 1.46). Subjects and Methods: Participants were given questionnaire packets including demographic details, mindful attention awareness scale, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale version 11 (BIS-11) and General Health Questionnaire-12. Statistical Analysis Used: Pearson correlations were used to examine the association between mindfulness and Impulsivity. Partial correlations were examined between impulsivity and mindfulness measures while controlling for psychological distress. Results: Dispositional mindfulness was negatively correlated with psychological distress (r = −0.40, P < 0.01) and BIS-11 scores (BIS total: r = 0.50; attentional: r = 0.44; motor: r = −0.23 non-planning: r = 0.25, P < 0.01). Relationship remained significant between mindfulness and impulsivity while after controlling for psychological distress. Conclusions: Dispositional mindfulness related to the ability to refrain from impulsive behavior in the presence of psychological distress
  3,775 346 2
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Schizophrenia and yogic concepts
Hitesh Chandrakant Sheth
January-June 2013, 1(1):34-39
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.123290  
Background: There is a great deal of overlap between the symptoms of schizophrenia and the nature of yogic experiences described in various societies and religions. Aim: This study aims to separate the symptoms of psychotic disorders from the experiences described by various yogic systems. Materials and Methods: A review of various scriptures like Shrimad Bhagvad Gita, Vedas, and other spiritual literature was done and was compared with the various scientific studies regarding yogic experiences. Results: The result shows that, there exist the abnormal behaviors, which need to be controlled by taking help from psychiatry, but there are also the genuine yogic experiences, that are often confused with the symptoms of a psychotic disorder like schizophrenia. Conclusions: The science of psychiatry is playing an important role in classifying the behavioral patterns and thus helping us to control the abnormal behavior patterns. Still, we cannot deny the fact that, the budding science in a developmental stage is unable to unravel the complete mysteries of human mind and because of that; some genuine yogic experiences are often confused with psychotic disorders.
  3,097 237 -
Hindi version of Vedic Personality Inventory-reliability and construct validity
Rahul Singh, Mandeep Singh, Sasidharan K Rajesh, Judu V Ilavarasu, Balaram Pradhan, Sudheer Deshpande
January-June 2015, 3(1):1-4
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.161019  
Context: According to the scripture, Guëäs are the fundamental ways by which a man's thought and deeds are guided. Study of Guëäs plays a very important role in yoga research. Aim: Aims of the current research were to prepare a translated Hindi version of the Vedic Personality Inventory (H-VPI) and assess the internal consistencies as well as construct validity. Settings and Design: This is a cross-sectional study comprised of 284 samples (74 females and 210 males). Participants' age ranged between 18 and 65 years with a mean age of 25.23 years (standard deviation = 8.77). The subjects were from Alwar District, Rajasthan India. Who were the students of graduation and postgraduation studies at the Siddhi Vinak College, Government Higher Secondary School and local participants. Subjects and Methods: Participants were given questionnaire packets including demographic details, H-VPI, Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale, General Health Questionnaire, and positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) scale. Results: Cronbach's α for the H-VPI indicate adequate internal consistency ranging from 0.69 to 0.91. Mindfulness was correlated positively (r = 0.36) with Sattava and negatively with Rajas (r = −0.19 and Tamas (r = −0.36). Psychological distress was correlated negatively with Sattava (r = −0.45) and positively with Rajas (r = 0.33) and Tamas (r = 0.37). PA was correlated positively with Sattava (r = 0.19) and negatively with Rajas (r = −0.10) and Tamas (r = −0.19). NA was correlated negatively with Sattava (r = −0.38), and positively with Rajas (r = 0.22), and Tamas (r = 0.36). Conclusions: In summary, the current study found that the H-VPI has adequate reliability and construct validity. This questionnaire will be very useful in assessing Yogic personality (Guëäs), whom the native language is Hindi. Key words: Affect, distress, guna, mindfulness, reliability, yoga
  2,607 562 -
Relationship between Triguna theory and well-being indicators
Pulkit Khanna, Kamlesh Singh, Surbhi Singla, Vivek Verma
July-December 2013, 1(2):69-74
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.157888  
The Indian perspective of personality deals with the tri-dimensional classification of Gunas (Sattva, Rajas, and Tamas) entailing physical, mental, and spiritual elements of personality. The present study aims to examine the relationship between Gunas and well-being indicators such as psychological capital, personality, life satisfaction, and subjective happiness. The study was conducted on two samples. Vedic Personality Inventory [1] and Mental Health Continuum-Short Form [2] were administered to both samples. The first sample consisted of 80 Indian professionals (males = 51 and females = 29) with mean age = 28.8 years (SD = 7.19) who were administered Psychological Capital Questionnaire [3] and Big-Five Personality Inventory [4] and the second sample consisted of 110 students (males = 82 and females = 28) with mean age = 21 years (SD = 2.72) who were administered Satisfaction with Life Scale [5] and Subjective Happiness Scale. [6] Across both studies, Sattva was found to be positively correlated with well-being. Rajas and Tamas were negatively correlated with well-being. Higher levels of Sattva and well-being were reported in the older age-group. Males scored higher on Rajas while no gender differences were found in well-being.
  2,740 292 3
Indian psychology: Understanding the basics
Vinayachandra K Banavathy, Anuradha Choudry
January-June 2015, 3(1):9-13
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.161028  
This paper is based on the premise that Indian tradition is a rich store-house of knowledge on the human phenomenon, which is yet to be tapped adequately within the academic framework. Indian Psychology (IP), evolves from certain time-tested methodologies and 'technologies' in studying and understanding human nature based on centuries of rigorous self-observation and inner research by dedicated and conscientious 'explorers' of the realms of consciousness. The available records on these experiments bear testimony to the fact that they are repeatable and verifiable provided the necessary 'instruments' are well equipped and adequately calibrated. This paper attempts to give a brief introduction to the basic characteristics of IP. It starts by providing the context and need for IP. Further, it discusses certain important characteristics of IP and concludes with an emphasis on the need for an experiential understanding
  2,196 424 -
BOOK REVIEW
Dynamic Suryanamaskar Sun Salutations
S Bashyam
January-June 2013, 1(1):57-58
  2,275 272 -
CONCEPT PAPER
Unearthing the upanishadic roots for "The Song of Sanyasin" of Swami Vivekananda
Rajesha Halekote Karisetty, Ramachandra G Bhat
January-June 2013, 1(1):53-55
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.123293  
The vigorous life of a Sannyasin, an ascetic, seems to be practically difficult in this modern age. But Swami Vivekananda affirms that a life of spiritual enlightenment is very much possible in his "The Song of Sannyasin", which he had composed with 13 stanzas in July 1895 at Thousand Island Park, New York. The powerful words of Swamiji echoes the profound wisdom base from the Upanishads motivating even a normal man towards renunciation to attain the higher goal of spiritual perfection. A scholar of Vedanta, who reads this poem, will be fascinated to see how the Upanishad mantras have got translated into English through the poetic words of Swamiji. Hence this research tried to bring out the Upanishadic connection for all 13 stanzas of this poem and to establish the relevance and practical application of the age old Upanishadic wisdom.
  2,340 193 -
EDITORIAL
Layers of consciousness
HR Nagendra
January-June 2013, 1(1):1-2
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.123283  
  2,155 378 -
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Concept of contentment in various literatures
Sahukar Madhura, Pailoor Subramanya
January-June 2015, 3(1):14-19
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.161030  
The modern society has given us options and choices. More we have, more dissatisfied we are! Dissatisfaction brings nothing but unhappiness. The contented man is pleased with what he has. Such contentment breeds happiness and is worth cultivating. Various spiritual and yogic literatures explain the importance of being satisfied, with what to be satisfied and how to achieve satisfaction. This study unveils how our ancient time people were contented despite of the distractions from external world. The study explored Bhagavad Geeta, chanakya nīti, Samayocitapadyaratnamālikā (subhaṣita), śrī caitanya caritāmṛta, dhammapāda, Dīgha Nikāya, Nārada bhakti sutra, Patanjali Yoga Sutra, Yoga Vasistha, and Upanishads. This study answers what is satisfaction? How one can be satisfied? With what one should be satisfied? And why one should be satisfied? Satisfaction is the greatest wealth and highest happiness. It brings effortless concentration and removes obstacles in the path of Yoga. One who is satisfied is dear to God. As long as one is not satisfied in the self, he will be subjected to sorrow. With the rise of contentment the purity of one's heart blooms. The contented man who possesses nothing owns the world. This study is unveils how our ancient time people were contented despite of the distractions from external world. It is worth to be discriminative of what we should be contented with and what not.
  2,031 282 -
Psychiatry, karma and gene expression
Hitesh Chandrakant Sheth
January-June 2014, 2(1):15-20
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.157988  
Background: There is a wide spread belief in our society that only genes play a significant role in shaping men's behavior and illness he inherits from his parents. Aim: This study aims to determine the role of man's karma, his thoughts and position of planets on expression of genes and level of neurotransmitters. Materials and Methods: A review of various Indian literatures was done and was compared with various scientific studies regarding genes expression. Results: The result shows that men's behavior and destiny are affected by many factors such as genes, environment, karma, thoughts, and planets. The role played by men's karma in shaping his behavior, is not less than the role played by the genes he has inherited from his parents. Conclusion: The scripts written in deoxyribonucleic acid may have a major say in shaping men's behavior and illness he develops, but the environment, thoughts and karma, also play an important role in this matter. Genes build neural structures and proteins not behavior. We are not the helpless flotsam caught in a fiery flood called life, but the architect of our own destiny.
  2,024 180 -
Comparative study on individual's performance orientation and their aura life color
V Vaidehi Priyal, N Ramkumar
July-December 2014, 2(2):35-41
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.159126  
Background: The purpose of this study is to analyze the individual's performance orientation based on their aura life color. Methods: For the present study, a questionnaire was framed to assess seven aura colors based on eight components, such as approach to physical reality, mental attitude, emotional makeup, social style, personal power and leadership style, financial choices, career options and spirituality, and individual's performance orientation factors: loyalty, workaholic and goal-orientation. Data from 189 respondents was drawn from service (academic and hospital) and manufacturing (textile and auto component) sectors in Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu (India). Results: The questionnaire was subjected to reliability analysis and found to be reliable. The Independent Sample T Test analysis was done between aura life colors of higher (violet, indigo, blue, green) and lower (yellow, orange, red) order chakras with all performance orientation factors. It is inferred that individuals in aura life colors of higher order chakras are comparatively more loyal and goal-oriented when compared with individuals in lower order chakras. Similarly, it is identified that there is significant difference between individuals with violet - red, blue - red and green - red aura life colors with performance orientation factors. The result of which is, violet respondents are goal-oriented and blue respondents are found to be loyal when compared with respondents of red aura life color. Also, green respondents are found to be workaholic and goal-oriented when compared with respondents of red aura life color. Conclusion: The results of this study will guide researchers, in how performance can be improved by progression of individuals in aura life colors of lower order chakras to higher order chakras through spiritual management techniques.
  1,980 208 -
The immediate effect on psycho-physiological changes after practice set of asana
Satyabrata Sahoo, Balaram Pradhan
July-December 2013, 1(2):82-86
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.157898  
Background: The present study was intended to study, "the immediate effect on the psycho-physiological changes after practices set of asanas." The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of yogasanas on: Psychological change (stress level) and physiological changes (energy and function of organs). Methods: A total of 21 male volunteers with age range (18-30 years) were investigated. They were all residential students of a Yoga University (S-VYASA University, Bengaluru). They have been practicing yoga for last 1 year. Design: This was a self as control study; all the participants were assessed before and after the intervention to measure the psycho-physiological variables. Assessments: (i) Psychological change (stress level) and (ii) physiological change (energy and function of organs). Intervention: The intervention consisted a series of eight yoga postures. Data Analysis: Data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon sign rank test for (pre and post) assessments. Results: There were no significant changes after yoga practices in the experimental and control session. The activation coefficient, an integral entropy, and integral area were compared to their baseline scores. Conclusion: Mild psychological stress level increased immediately after the yoga session compared to control session. At the same time, the disorder in the regulation of physical functions decreased after the yoga session compared to control session. In further study other variable of gas discharge, visualization might be included for better understanding.
  1,925 230 -
BOOK REVIEW
The matrix concept fundamentals of matrix rhythm therapy
Itagi Ravi Kumar
January-June 2015, 3(1):20-21
  1,746 325 -
REVIEW ARTICLES
Physiological effect of kriyas: Cleansing techniques
Sanjib Kumar Patra
January-June 2017, 5(1):3-5
DOI:10.4103/ijny.ijoyppp_31_17  
The literal meaning of Kriya is cleansing. Kriyas are categorized into six and every one of them has a particular role to play as far as their cleansing action is concerned. The practice of Kriya is quoted with its subclassification in Hatha Yoga pradipika and Gheranda samhita. However, in this theoretical scientific article, all varieties of Kriyas described in Hatha Yoga have been explained with its physiological effects. Evidence-based findings are limited using Kriyas as the interventions; therefore, author has made an attempt to put the observed finding and unpublished observations following the practice of each Kriya technique.
  1,873 146 -
FROM THE EDITORS DESK
Opening a new vista
Ramachandra G Bhat
January-June 2013, 1(1):3-3
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.123284  
  1,655 239 -
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Anantasamäpatti - A technique prescribed by Pataïjali for the practice of äsana: An analysis of traditional literature
M Jayaraman
July-December 2013, 1(2):75-81
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.157895  
Introduction: Āsana is an important constituent of Yoga. The impact of Anantasamāpatti, a technique for the practice of āsana prescribed by patañ jali, in the practice of Yogāsana remains to be scientifically assessed. Scientific verification presupposes conceptual clarity. A cursory survey of contemporary interpretations reveals that Anantasamāpatti has been represented variously. Objectives and Method: In the light of this contemporary uncertainty, effort is made to refer to and analyse the traditional view point which is preserved in the form of Sanskrit commentaries regarding the meaning and mechanism of working of this technique to assist better understanding and implementation of this most ancient technique in the practice of Yogāsana. Result: Contemporary uncertainty regarding Ananatasamāpatti seems to stem from traditional sources. Conclusion: Based on the literary evidences Ananta is the probable reading and the meaning seems to be Śeṣa. Samāpatti is visualization of oneself as firm and strong like Śeṣa. The mechanism of working seems to be the effect of the mental visualization on physical firmness. And this requires to be practiced along with prayantaśaithilya.
  1,687 191 -
REVIEW ARTICLES
Psi, consciousness, and reality
Thaiyar M Srinivasan
January-June 2014, 2(1):9-14
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.157987  
Parapsychology and psychic phenomena are looked open with great deal of suspicion. However, siddhis have been discussed in details in Yoga Sutras and practitioners of Yoga have glimpsed these siddhis at least in passing. Further, in India, one could always come across siddhas-people who exhibit siddhis-of various colors and hues, so one is not intimidated or confused regarding this aspect of Yogic practices. There have been attempts to link stages of consciousness to psychic competency and to siddhis. While consciousness is not defined adequately in literature, the nature of reality is defined as related to sensory world only. Psi research opens up possibilities of extending both the understanding of consciousness and the nature of reality, while Yogic literature and Vedanta could throw much clarity to both these through workable hypothesis. This paper attempts to present these ideas and proposes a model for Turiya Consciousness (TC) or Ultimate Reality that ancient wisdom refers to in Vedanta.
  1,676 154 -
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
A comparative study on two yogic relaxation techniques on anxiety in school children
Natesh Babu, Balaram Pradhana, HR Nagendra
July-December 2013, 1(2):65-68
DOI:10.4103/2347-5633.157887  
Background: Meditation brings calmness to the mental activities and develops the internal awareness. It can be helpful in reducing stress and anxiety in student community and academicians. Aims: The aim was to measure the outcomes of cyclic meditation (CM), yogic relaxation technique, when compared to supine rest (SR). We examine reduction in anxiety, using Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Materials and Methods: A total of 60 high school students (both genders) participated in this study, aged between 13 and 16 years (group average age ± standard deviation, 14.78 ± 1.22 years). They were attending 10 days yoga training course during their summer vacation. Those children's, who had English as the main medium of instructions, were included. They acted as their own controls. They were divided into two groups and tested on the STAI, immediately before and after 22:30 min of practice of CM on 1 day, and immediately before and after an equal period of SR on the other day. For the assessment, the first group performed CM on day 9, and SR on day 10. For the second group, the order was reversed. Results: There was a significant reduction on STAI scores within group (pre and post) of CM (4.27%, P = 0.016) session and no change in SR session. Further, subgroup analysis based on gender revealed that the female group had a significant reduction following both sessions, but male group had nonsignificant reduction in STAI score. The female group found significantly differs from the male group in STAI score on both the sessions. Conclusions: The CM found to be a useful technique to combat the state of anxiety with different magnitude of changes in gender subgroups. The female group was benefitted more by following both CM and SR sessions compared with male group.
  1,365 318 -
Feedback
Subscribe