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 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 42-43

Ayurveda approach of psyche in manifestation of diseases


Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic Sciences, Ministry of AYUSH, Government of India, New Delhi, India

Date of Submission02-Feb-2021
Date of Acceptance22-Feb-2021
Date of Web Publication17-Mar-2021

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Amin Hetalben
Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic Sciences, Ministry of AYUSH, Government of India, New Delhi
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijoyppp.ijoyppp_2_21

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How to cite this article:
Hetalben A. Ayurveda approach of psyche in manifestation of diseases. Int J Yoga - Philosop Psychol Parapsychol 2021;9:42-3

How to cite this URL:
Hetalben A. Ayurveda approach of psyche in manifestation of diseases. Int J Yoga - Philosop Psychol Parapsychol [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Apr 13];9:42-3. Available from: https://www.ijoyppp.org/text.asp?2021/9/1/42/311402



Sir,

As described in an earlier Editorial,[1] it was said that mind is the source of wellness and illness as per classical Yoga text. Ayurveda also said the same as Vishado Rogavardhananam.[2] This single Sanskrit line seems to be an acronym of the whole concept of physiopsychopathology in Ayurveda. The psychosomatic approach of Ayurveda reflects clearly from this quotation. Disease may or may not be caused by psychological factors, but it steps ahead with the degree of mental drop off. It may be because disease (Roga) represents any kind of pain (Ruja), i.e., the experience, tolerance , and expression of pain are solely dependent upon tolerance of psyche (Sattvabala), and hence, the definition of disease in Ayurveda itself reveals the psychological aspect of all diseases whether somatic or psychosomatic.

Atmajnana (self realization) and Sukha Prapti (desire of happiness) are the main aim for all Darshanas in the form of Atyantika (moksha) except Mimansa. In Mimansa Darshana they believe it in the form of Tadatvika (heaven). In spite of having different opinions of all the Astika and Nastika Darshana, they all believe the importance of Manas (psyche) in the process of perception. Ayurveda still possessed its own peculiarities regarding the Manas concept.

Ayurveda defines Ayu (life) as the combined state of Sharira (body), Indriya (senses), Sattva (psyche/mind), and Atma (soul). According to Ayurveda, disease is manifested at body (Sharira) and mind (Manas) both levels. Rajas and Tamas are the two Doshas of Manas, which play a major role for producing the diseases both psychological and somatic. As Vata Dosha is responsible for many of diseases, Rajas also plays a dominant role in Manas diseases. Mind is the only creator, regulator, and re-creator of all bodily constituents acting through the metaphysical, intellectual, and bodily level. The perfect harmony of mind (Manas) responsible for the perfect harmony of body because physical is merely an out picturing of the mental. Every discordant thought, feeling, or emotion must pay the penalty in the physical manifestation of some discord.

The causes of diseases relating to both mind and body are threefold, i.e., wrong utilization, nonutilization, and excessive utilization of time, mental faculties, and objects of sense organs.[3] Balanced utilization (of time, mental faculties, and object of sense organ) is the cause of happiness. When psychic or somatic diseases become chronic due to their intensity, they may get combined with each other.[4] The body and mind constitute the substrata of diseases and happiness.

Mistaken belief by the intellect and misconduct is to be understood as Prajna Paradha because they come under the kin of the Manas.[5] Even the endogenous disease are caused by some defect in the intellectual faculty (for example, exposing oneself to eternal wind, taking undesirable, rough food), still they are as a matter of fact direct results of vitiation of the bodily constituents as per Ayurveda. Acharya Vagbhata gives more importance to Manas than body in the context of pathogenesis. Modern psychology also gives an importance to mental imbalance as the cause of diseases. A comparative study reveals that both Western and Eastern sciences give due importance to psychic factor in the generation of diseases. Getting of undesired things and not getting desired things can also produce psychological disorders. This is based on the theory of the Raga (desire) and Dvesha (jealousy), both of these are said to be causative factors for psychological disorders. The dissatisfaction and over excitement can produce different kinds of psychological problems.

It is well known that worry, anxiety, fear kill millions and millions of red blood cells every day.[6] Fear, anger, jealousy, envy, and hatred are considered as indications of disease and messenger of death. Ayurvedic psychopathology can enrich the concept of Manas in psychoanalytic field, biological, physical, and sociomoral aspects. The eminent scholars of modern psychology can enrich much knowledge about mind with knowledge of Indian concept of mind.

This is how it can be easily concluded that description of mind (Manas) in Ayurvedic classics has its own importance and applied utility. This report is intended to request every physician who gives personalized attention and offers sufficient motivation to their patients and heals them in a friendly manner with psychological treatment. Being a health science with Holistic approach, Ayurveda puts Manas as an integral part of life and therefore recommends various practices to control mind (Manas) for Healthy life.

Financial support and sponsorship

Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic Sciences, New Delhi, India, supported the study.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Nagendra HR. Mind: The Source of wellness and illness. Int J Yoga Philosop Psychol Parapsychol 2020;8:39-40.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Agnivesha, Charaka Samhita, Ayurveda-Dipika Commentary by Chakrapanidutta, Revised ed., Sutra Sthana (25:40). Varanasi: Chaukhambha Surbharati Prakashan; 2011. p. 356.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Agnivesha, Charaka Samhita, Ayurveda-Dipika Commentary by Chakrapanidutta, Revised ed., Sutra Sthana (1/54). Varanasi: Chaukhambha Surbharati Prakashan; 2011. p. 25.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Agnivesha, Charaka Samhita, Ayurveda-Dipika Commentary by Chakrapanidutta, Revised ed. Vimana Sthana (6/38). Varanasi: Chaukhambha Surbharati Prakashan; 2011. p. 456.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Agnivesha, Charaka Samhita, Ayurveda-Dipika Commentary by Chakrapanidutta, Revised ed., Sutra Sthana (1/109). Varanasi: Chaukhambha Surbharati Prakashan; 2011. p. 56.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Shafiee M, Tayefi M, Hassanian SM, Ghaneifar Z, Parizadeh MR, Avan A, et al. Depression and anxiety symptoms are associated with white blood cell count and red cell distribution width: A sex-stratified analysis in a population-based study. Psychoneuroendocrinology 2017;84:101-8.  Back to cited text no. 6
    




 

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